Fannie Lou Hamer: American History 

  Fannie Lou Hamer (/ˈheɪmər/; born Fannie Lou Townsend; October 6, 1917 – March 14, 1977) was an American voting rights activist, civil rights leader, and philanthropist. She was instrumental in organizing Mississippi’s Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and later became the vice-chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, which she represented at the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey. 

On August 23, 1962, Rev. James Bevel, an organizer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and an associate of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., gave a sermon in Ruleville, Mississippi, and followed it with an appeal to those assembled to register to vote. On August 31, she traveled on a rented bus with other attendees of Bevel’s sermon to Indianola, Mississippi, to register. In what would become a signature trait of Hamer’s activist career, she began singing Christian hymns, such as “Go Tell It on the Mountain” and “This Little Light of Mine”, to the group in order to bolster their resolve. The hymns also reflected Hamer’s belief that the civil rights struggle was a deeply spiritual one. That same day, upon Hamer’s return to her plantation, she was fired by Marlow who told her not to try to vote.

On June 9, 1963, Hamer was on her way back from Charleston, South Carolina with other activists from a literacy workshop. Stopping in Winona, Mississippi, the group was arrested on a false charge and jailed. Once in jail, Hamer’s colleagues were beaten by the police in the booking room. Hamer was then taken to a cell where two inmates were ordered, by the police, to beat her using a blackjack. The police ensured she was held down during the almost fatal beating, and beat her further when she started to scream. 
Released on June 12, she needed more than a month to recover.
Though the incident had profound physical and psychological effects, Hamer returned to Mississippi to organize voter registration drives, including the “Freedom Ballot Campaign”, a mock election, in 1963, and the “Freedom Summer” initiative in 1964. She was known to the volunteers of Freedom Summer — most of whom were young, white, and from northern states — as a motherly figure who believed that the civil rights effort should be multi-racial in nature. In addition to her “Northern” guests, Hamer played host to Tuskegee University student activists Sammy Younge Jr. and Wendell Paris. Younge and Paris grew to become profound activsts and organizers under Hamer’s tutelage. (Younge ultimately gave his life for the movement in 1966, when he was murdered at a Standard Oil gas station in Macon County, Alabama for using a “whites-only” bathroom.

In the summer of 1964, the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, or “Freedom Democrats” for short, was organized with the purpose of challenging Mississippi’s all-white and anti-civil rights delegation to the Democratic National Convention, which failed to represent all Mississippians. Hamer was elected Vice-Chair. 

Hamer was invited, along with the rest of the MFDP officers, to address the Convention’s Credentials Committee. She recounted the problems she had encountered in registration, and the ordeal of the jail in Winona. Near tears, she concluded:

“ All of this is on account we want to register [sic], to become first-class citizens, and if the Freedom Democratic Party is not seated now, I question America. Is this America, the land of the free and the home of the brave where we have to sleep with our telephones off the hooks because our lives be threatened daily because we want to live as decent human beings — in America? —Fannie Lou Hamer”

Hamer died of heart failure due to hypertension on March 14, 1977, at the age of 59 at a hospital in Mound Bayou, Mississippi and was buried in her hometown of Ruleville, Mississippi. Her tombstone is engraved with one of her famous quotes: 

“ I am sick and tired of being sick and tired. —Fannie Lou Hamer”

  

US Removes Cuba From Terror List

  The United States has removed Cuba from its list of state sponsors of terrorism.
The move eliminates a major obstacle toward restoring diplomatic ties.
The change allows Cuba to conduct banking in the United States, among other activities.
President Barack Obama announced a historic thaw with Cuba in December, but the US trade embargo against the country remains, and may only be ended by Congress.
The removal has been one of Cuba’s key demands, as leaders from both countries have repeatedly met to negotiate the details of restoring diplomatic relations, including the opening of embassies in Washington and Havana.
The action comes as signs of difficulty were seen in recent talks between US and Cuban diplomats.

Last week, diplomats met in Washington, but failed to come to an agreement on opening embassies.
The BBC’s State Department Correspondent Barbara Plett Usher says the removal will give Cuba greater access to sources of international financing that were previously denied.
“The United States has significant concerns and disagreements with a wide range of Cuba’s policies and actions,” the State Department said in a statement. But those concerns, it said “fall outside the criteria relevant to the rescission of a State Sponsor of Terrorism designation”.

May 28, 1963: Woolworth Sit-in in Jackson, Mississippi

 On May 28, 1963, in Jackson, Mississippi, the Woolworth sit-in occurred. “This was the most violently attacked sit-in during the 1960s. A huge mob gathered, with open police support while the three of us sat there for three hours. I was attacked with fists, brass knuckles and the broken portions of glass sugar containers, and was burned with cigarettes.” —John Salter (Hunter Bear), seated in photo with Joan Trumpauer (now Mulholland), and Anne Moody (author of Coming of Age in Mississippi).  

Secret Recording Reveals How Malcolm X Reacted When FBI Attempted to Recruit Him to Inform Against the Nation of Islam: click the link 

Secret Recording Reveals How Malcolm X Reacted When FBI Attempted to Recruit Him to Inform Against the Nation Of Islam http://atlantablackstar.com/2015/05/22/secret-recording-reveals-how-malcolm-x-reacted-when-fbi-attempted-to-recruit-him-to-inform-against-the-nation-of-islam/

Rest In Peace Riley B. King (B.B. King) 

  

 Riley B. King (September 16, 1925 – May 14, 2015), known by his stage name B.B. King, was an American blues singer, songwriter, and guitarist.

Rolling Stone magazine ranked him at No. 6 on its 2011 list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time (previously ranked No. 3 in the 2003 edition of the same list), and he was ranked No. 17 in Gibson’s “Top 50 Guitarists of All Time”. According to Edward M. Komara, King “introduced a sophisticated style of soloing based on fluid string bending and shimmering vibrato that would influence virtually every electric blues guitarist that followed.” King was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. King was also inducted into 2014 class of the R&B Music Hall of Fame. He is considered one of the most influential blues musicians of all time, earning the nickname “The King of Blues”, and one of the “Three Kings of the Blues Guitar” (along with Albert King and Freddie King). King was also known for performing tirelessly throughout his musical career, appearing at more than 200 concerts per year on average into his 70s. In 1956, he reportedly appeared at 342 shows.

In 1990, King was awarded the National Medal of Arts by President George H.W. Bush.[10] In 2006, he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President George W. Bush. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential blues guitarists of all time, inspiring countless other electric blues and blues rock guitarists.

  

I Want To Thank God For Another Year On This Earth (Psalms 23)

  Today on my birthday I’m reminded of Psalms 23. Psalms 23 is very relevant  to me today because King David, who wrote Psalms 23 saw in his life, what I’ve also now have seen in my life. King David came from being a Shepherd of sheep of his father’s cattle, one of 8 brothers (The baby brother) nobody thought he would grow up to become a great deal. But nevertheless he rose up to become king, and while being the king of Israel he composed this psalm. Realizing just as he was a Shepherd over his father’s sheep. In that same way God our father in heaven has been the Shepherd over our lives as well. 

“The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. He makes me to lie down in green pastures; He leads me beside the still waters. He restores my soul; He leads me in the paths of righteousness For His name’s sake. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil; For You are with me; Your rod and Your staff, they comfort me. You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies; You anoint my head with oil; My cup runs over. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me All the days of my life; And I will dwell in the house of the LORD Forever”. (‭Psalms‬ ‭23‬:‭1-6‬ NKJV)